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The Only Cheap Lamb Cuts Guide You’ll Ever Need (You’re Welcome!) The Only Cheap Lamb Cuts Guide You’ll Ever Need (You’re Welcome!)

The Only Cheap Lamb Cuts Guide You’ll Ever Need (You’re Welcome!)

When it comes to lamb, we get it: things can get pricey. But we’re here to tell you that eating lamb doesn’t have to be heavy on your wallet. In fact, it can be downright baaagain-filled (we’ll see ourselves out) - and really fun, too.

We put together this economical lamb cuts guide to help get you there. And we promise – no rack of lamb or lamb chops in sight. Our goal is to keep your wallet and your tummy filled and happy (what else does one really need, after all? Nothing. The answer is nothing). The secret? The lamb cuts that are a whole lot more affordable but just as tasty and easy to cook with, so you can create your own fakeaways that are a whole lot cheaper – and yummier – than the curry house around the corner.

Lamb Shoulder

Lamb shoulder’s famous for its robustness and is full of flavour. And it’s super versatile, too! Because it takes a little while to become tender, it’s the perfect choice for slow-roasting or stewing for fool-proof crowd pleasers.

How do I cook lamb shoulder?

To maximise on flavour, be sure to cook your lamb shoulder on the bone so that the meat falls easily away with a fork.

Try making your own pulled lamb by marinating a whole shoulder in garlic, chilli and paprika – the longer, the better. Wrap the shoulder in foil and cook slowly, pull the meat away from the bone and serve however you like – bread buns, flatbreads – the sky’s the limit.

Or you could also throw together a herb rub with rosemary, garlic, salt, pepper and olive oil – just massage it into the shoulder joint. Pop on top of some onion wedges, add some water and cook low and slow (around 160ºC, or 140ºC fan) for 4-5 hours.

Check out our lamb shoulder recipes and get cookin' 

Lamb Leg Steak

Lamb leg steak is deliciously juicy when cooked the right way and is the perfect choice if you’re short on time and looking for a quick dinner.

How do I cook lamb leg steak?

They are available as boneless or bone in leg steaks and are perfect roasted, pan-fried, grilled or cooked on the barbecue.

Simply pan fry or griddle it for 3 to 5 minutes on each side if you’re a medium-rare fan, or a little longer if you like it well done.

Or, if you’re keen to spruce things up a bit, you can rub your lamb leg steak with whichever herbs you like, oil and garlic (mustard, too, if you’re feeling adventurous), roast it in the oven, and then finish it off on the barbeque to add a tasty smoky flavour. Et voila.

Got lamb leg steak? We've got the recipes

Lamb Mince

If you haven’t mixed up your classic spag-bol to make a lamb spaghetti bolognese, you’re missing out. Lamb mince is versatile, yummy, quick and easy. Boxes ticked.

How do I make lamb mince?

We’re sticking with spag-bol for now, but you can totally throw this sauce on a pizza, flatbread or pretty much anything for some tasty chow.  

Pop some carrots, onion, garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper (and whatever else you fancy in your spag-bol sauce) into your food processor and blend it into a fine mixture. Sauté this mixture in a pot for 5 minutes, then add your lamb mince and cook for 5-7 minutes, until it’s brown. Add passata or chopped tomatoes and stir that up. Bring it to a simmering boil and cook for another 20 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and let that cook for around 40 minutes more. That’s it, you’re done!

Got lamb mince? Get these meatballs rollin' 

And there you have it. Five simple meals from cheap lamb cuts, as tasty as they are easy.

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